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Current & Upcoming Courses

So many interesting courses this term — how will you choose?

Expanded information about upcoming courses are offered by the professors who will teach them.

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH


 

LIT 204A
Critical Analysis
Fall 2014
Keri Behre

More about this course from the instructor:
The stories we tell ourselves are important. This course is about those stories – about how our stories mesh together as a community, and about how we can look more closely at the stories we will approach in the coming quarters. Literary texts have value because they reflect and affect our humanity in surprising and often uncomfortable ways. And the best stories, the best arguments, the best theory – all of these things speak to us only when we speak to them. This weekend we will begin that process, together.

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LIT 205E
Intro to Literary Studies
Fall 2014
Tiffany Kraft

More about this course from the instructor:
Together, we will study and practice the elements of argumentation;
engage ourselves with the "discipline" of literary studies: its methodologies, terms, and theories; select and read works of fiction, poetry, and drama; and experiment with genres of literary analysis and response. To accomplish this, we will participate in discussions and cultivate presences on our individual WordPress accounts and on Twitter. Our project for the course will involve three stages: 1) write a traditional academic argument essay, 2) experiment with genre by writing an essay that involves both argument and personal narrative, and 3) further experiment by creating a piece of literary criticism that engages and responds to the work we are studying in class for a public audience.

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LIT 302A
Survey of British Literature
Fall 2014
Meg Roland

More about this course from the instructor:
What is the essential element of a plant--the flower or the leaf?

This question formed the basis of a famous and well-loved medieval poem, The Floure and the Leafe. What should guide our hearts--reason or passion? Literature is one of the expressive means of exploring the deepest human questions. In this class, we will sample our literary heritage, reading works written in Engish from the earliest-known poems, surviving in manuscript fragments, to contemporary fiction. Throughout, we will approach literature as a form of lively debate, a way in which writers, readers, and scholars work out questions of love, duty, betrayal, reason, friendship, and identity:in short, what it means to be human.

How would you answer the question--the flower? or the leaf? Looking forward to your thoughts.
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LIT 307E
Survey of American Literature: American Gothic
Fall 2014
Chuck Caruso

More about this course from the instructor:
This course will explore a wide range of U.S. literature including early colonial and national roots, inventing nationhood, confrontations with race and gender, and anxieties about individuality, voice and democracy. As a method for exploring the literature of the American Republic, we will focus on examining the wide variety of rhetorical strategies and genre conventions these writers employ to convey textual meaning—either asserting authority or undermining it. The use of "close reading" strategies will be emphasized throughout the course.

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LIT 326A
Drama
Fall 2014
Keri Behre

More about this course from the instructor:
In this course, we will explore the many facets of drama: drama on the page, drama on the stage, and drama on the screen. In LIT 326, we will learn how to understand, appreciate, and enjoy drama as a literary genre and also as a performance. Through reading the plays, watching live performances throughout the semester, and writing about what we read and see, we will become informed critics who understand interpretations of plays and the meanings behind those interpretations. We will explore how drama reflects our personal and societal issues, emotions, and desires through the study of 1) historical periods, 2) genre distinctions, 3) directorial choices, and 4) actors' performances. The study of drama as text and as performance will allow us to grow as critical thinkers, interpreters, and writers. It will also enable our educated participation in theatre experiences long beyond this course.

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LIT 420E
Irish Literature & National
Fall 2014
Ger Killeen

More about this course from the instructor:
How did Yeats react to the 1916 uprising? What did Joyce think about romantic nationalism? Why did theatre-goers riot at the first performance of Synge's Playboy of the Western World? Where does Heaney stand on the Northern Troubles? How do Eavan Boland and Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill construct identities for themselves as women and poets?
Questions such as these will lead us to an examination of 20th Century Irish society and the way its major literary figures both shaped and were shaped by the social, cultural, and political forces struggling to define the identity of the newly emerging nation.
Ireland's status as both a colony and an independent nation and its struggle to maintain a separate identity while embracing the language of its colonizer will lead us to wide-ranging discussion of the fundamental issues in post-colonial theory that find expression in present-day writers.

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LIT 459E
SERVICE-LEARNING II
Fall 2014
Independent Study
Laura Moulton

More about this course from the instructor:
Arrange and complete a service-learning project in the community
Keep a journal of your time there (ie a short observational bit of writing after each shift will help to document the experiences you have – this can be informal, and include snippets of conversation, memories of interactions, etc.).
Complete a final paper (5 pages, double-spaced, 12 point) on the experience. Possible topics include: observations about how the organization works, descriptions of those it serves, the role you played in the organization. As part of this assignment, choose a person (patron/client at the organization, or someone who offers services) to interview, and include this in your paper, as a way to offer documentation of someone whose story would otherwise go untold. (Guidance on interview questions available if needed). Due: Friday, August 29
Meet once in person to discuss project and check in on progress.

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LIT 498E
Senior Thesis
Fall 2014
Keri Behre

More about this course from the instructor:
In this course, you will choose a paper that you have written in another class for your major and expand that paper into an analytical thesis. In addition to producing a work of original scholarship this term, we will also ask you to create a coordinating creative digital project which showcases your best abilities with digital media. These pieces will become part your final presentation portfolio, an assignment that is aimed to help you look outward, past graduation, to the way your ELNM degree will serve your future path. Finally, we will work carefully and conscientiously to create or polish a professional website as well as our "googlesumés."

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WR 221A
Introduction to Expository Writing and Critical Thinking
Fall 2014
Cara Hubbell

More about this course from the instructor:
Reviews and expands on the basic academic essay; teaches students how to analyze and develop a topic, write grammatically correct and organized essays, read professional writing, and apply these writing techniques to a range of academic essay styles.

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WR 222 A
Introduction to Literature and Writing: High Anxiety
Fall 2014
Jay Ponteri

More about this course from the instructor:
Through works of literature, students will examine human mutability, i.e., the various ways and reasons human beings change at all points in their lives. An essay from this class forms part of a student's English Literature and Writing Portfolio.

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WR 312A or ART 315A
Comic Arts Studio
Fall 2014
Trevor Dodge & Terry Blas

More about this course from the instructor:
Students will create comics that culminate in self-published mini-comics. During the creation of these comics, students will practice applying the fundamentals of visual storytelling in terms of plot and character development as well as the basic comics process of scripting, sketching, penciling, inking, and lettering. The course also will touch on the technical, historical, and cultural considerations facing cartoonists today. Comics have radically changed and grown with regard to subject matter, standards for technical proficiency, and popular acceptance in the United States in the last decade. Students will examine the reasons for this change and explore the many possibilities it opens up in the creation their own comics.

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WR 323A
Academic Writing: The Research Paper
Fall 2014
Beth Watzke & Kirk Howard

More about this course from the instructor:
College writers are expected to produce academic research papers on a variety of subjects. This advanced class will help students fulfill the requirements for academic writing. Students will learn how to define and focus their information needs in a subject area, how to access and evaluate information, and how to transform information into the foundation for original academic writing. The course reviews and implements the writing process as it applies to the conventions for various academic disciplines. Thesis, organization, process, and documentation will be emphasized, and issues such as writing across the disciplines and plagiarism will also be addressed. The foundation of the class is the exploration of a compelling topic question and the presentation in writing of resulting discoveries. Note: As proscribed by the ELW Department and by Marylhurst University requirements, the paper for WR 323 must be original for this course and can't be an older paper revised, nor can it be a paper from a concurrent class; the paper must be entirely original material written only for this course.

 Students will meet with Beth Watzke for the writing part of the course. Using writing exercises and readings from The Curious Researcher, we will explore the writing process, choose a topic and formulate research questions, devise strategies for research, compose tentative thesis, draft, revise, and produce an academic research paper. We meet with Kirk Howard at Shoen Library for the research section of the course, which covers research methods and systems, locating and evaluating sources, citations, bibliographies, and prospectus writing. We return to the writing classroom, where we will take the writing through drafting and workshops to produce a final paper that will meet academic standards.

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WR 323 EA
Academic Writing: The Research Paper
Fall 2014
Tiffany Kraft & Kirk Howard

More about this course from the instructor:
In this advanced course, students will meet online with Tiffany Kraft for the writing part of the course. We will read from The Curious Researcher and A Writer's Reference and use writing to explore and produce focus. Tiffany's lessons will cover the writing process, choosing and developing a topic, strategies for research, thesis, and prospectus, among others. Students will then meet with Kirk Howard for the research section of the course, where they will cover research methods and systems, locating and evaluating sources, citations, bibliographies, ethics. Students will then take the writing through drafting and workshops to produce a final paper that will meet academic standards.

College writers are expected to produce academic research papers on a variety of subjects. This advanced class will help students fulfill the requirements for professional and academic writing. The course teaches essential skills in finding and managing information. Students will learn how to define and focus their information needs in a subject area, how to access and evaluate information, and how to transform information into the foundation for original academic writing. The course reviews and implements the writing process as it applies to the conventions for various academic disciplines. Thesis, organization, process, and documentation will be emphasized; issues such as writing across the disciplines and plagiarism will also be included.

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WR 367A
Writing Seminar I: Poetry
Fall 2014
Emily Kendal Frey

More about this course from the instructor:
Throughout the last century, poets have questioned style, construction and the role of poetry in society. Many poets wrote about these ideas in addition to poems that incorporated their investigations. We will delve into some of the records alongside reading the poems they affected. This course involves students and participants in the study of selected poets whose works reveal the dynamics of poetic expression. Through the readings, writing assignments, classroom discussions and poetry workshops, students identify and shape their own voice, poetic style and writing techniques.

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WR 368 A
Writing Seminar I: Fiction
Fall 2014
Natalie Serber

 More about this course from the instructor:
TBA

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WR 375 A
Short Prose Forms
Fall 2014
Jay Ponteri

More about this course from the instructor:
This seminar will examine the genre of short prose forms—the prose poem, the short-short story, the lyrical essay, and the micro story, among others. We will take a close look within each of the forms to glean some of their essential qualities. Furthermore, we will lightly touch on the relationship between this genre and its literary antecedents, thus placing it in a tradition. We will consider how prose writers can better employ the poet's tools: sound, image, metaphor, syntax & diction, voice, meditation, and narrative. Students will write several prose pieces and read a handful of books.

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DEPARTMENT OF CULTURE & MEDIA


CMS 305E
New Media and Digital Culture
Fall 2014
John Urang

More about this course from the instructor:
This class will explore a variety of topics in digital culture, including the shifting boundaries between human and machine, the possibilities (and pitfalls) of collective intelligence and crowdsourcing, the aesthetic questions raised by computer-mediated art and music, the societal effects of the explosive growth of computer gaming and social media, and the changing landscapes of law, finance, and war in the information age. Course materials are intended to be accessible to students with no prior academic study of media theory or cultural studies. The readings, however, can be quite extensive (students are strongly encouraged to plan accordingly).

At the beginning of each week, I'll post the materials for the week, as well as some discussion prompts to get us started. Since this is an online course, your participation in the forums is extremely important for the success of the class. You should plan to contribute at least one considered answer (so maybe a short paragraph, rather than "yes" or "no") to each of the discussion questions, and to follow the conversation as it develops. This doesn't mean you need to be online and in the forums at all hours of the day. Instead, you should consider blocking out two or more times a week to engage with the class discussion (in addition to the time you spend doing the reading and working on the formal writing assignments).

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CAREER SERVICES

CAR 492E
Preparing for Graduate School
Fall 2014
Olivia Yeung

More about this course from the instructor:
This seminar is designed for Marylhurst undergraduates who are considering going to graduate school. Participants will reflect on their motivations for considering graduate school; will identify factors that need to be considered when evaluating graduate schools and programs; will research specific graduate programs; and will develop a graduate school action plan for themselves. This is a 4-week ONLINE course in Moodle.

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