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Current & Upcoming Courses

So many interesting courses this term — how will you choose?

Expanded information about upcoming courses are offered by the professors who will teach them.

ENGLISH LITERATURE & WRITING


LIT 321 A or CMS 321A
Literary and Critical Theory
Spring 2014
Mondays 3:15-6:00 pm
David Denny

More about this course from the instructor:

It may seem counter-intuitive to think that literature needs theory in order to legitimate itself. After all, doesn't theory just get in the way of experiencing the magic of literature? But, then, how do we distinguish literature from an editorial or an advertisement? The fact is that theory has always existed side by side literature in the attempt to distinguish itself as a unique form of human expression and taste. This class examines this relation by taking a journey into literature's past, examining how this question unfolds in the course of its history. We will read Plato, Wordsworth, Baudelaire, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Simone de Beauvoir, Monique Wittig, Edward Said, and Laura Mulvey.

LIT321E or CMS 321E
Literary and Critical Theory
Spring 2014
Online
Ger Killeen

More about this course from the instructor:

It may seem counter-intuitive to think that literature needs theory in order to legitimate itself. After all, doesn't theory just get in the way of experiencing the "magic" of literature? But, then, how do we distinguish literature from an editorial, an advertisement, or a piece of propaganda? The fact is that theory has always existed side by side with literature in literature's attempt to distinguish itself as a unique form of human expression and taste. This class examines this relation by taking a journey into literature's past, examining how fundamental questions of literariness, the means and methods of criticism, and the functions of literary texts unfold from early times to the present. We will read works by thinkers including Plato, Wordsworth, Baudelaire, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Simone de Beauvoir, Jacques Lacan, and Jacques Derrida.

LIT 323E or CMS 323E
African American Autobiography
Spring 2014
Online
Perrin Kerns

More about this course from the instructor:

In this course we will begin our reading with Frederick Douglass and end with Barack Obama. We will pair the readings of the autobiographies, reading a male writer and a female writer, from several eras. Our discussions will involve issues of gender as well as race as we look at self-representation in autobiography.

LIT 362E CMS 363E
Watching the Romance
Spring 2014
Online
John Urang

More about this course from the instructor:

Since almost every studio film includes some kind of love story, this syllabus could be coextensive with film history itself. To narrow down the field, I chose pairings of films and theoretical readings that offer insights into the uses and modalities of cinematic romance. So rather than asking what love is, we'll be asking what love does in these films. What role does the romantic plot play in the overall ideological functioning of the film? Each week, students will be required to watch one film and read related secondary material. The films will be available on reserve at the library, although most are also available to stream or rent at Netflix, Amazon Instant, iTunes, or your local video store.

LIT364A or CMS 364A
Introduction to Queer Studies
Spring 2014
Wednesday 3:15-6 and Online
Mike Randolph

More about this course from the instructor:

CMS364/LIT364 maps the terrain of the relatively new, interdisciplinary field of queer studies.
The course is designed to introduce students to some of the prominent perspectives, politics
and practitioners in the field. (Note: the terrain of queer studies is vast, and our survey of it is necessarily partial and incomplete—consider this class a beginning point rather than a complete journey.)

This class will focus on three general and inter-related themes:

• History & Identity: We will trace changing societal understandings of sexuality from the ancient world to contemporary society.

• Representation: We'll examine how queer representations in literature and popular culture support and/or challenge dominant ideas about gender and sexuality.

• Politics & the Law: We'll delve into contemporary political and legal discourse in order to explore how certain understandings of gender and sexuality are legitimated by the state.

Queer studies scholarship is overtly LGBTQ-affirmative and anti-homophobic in orientation. This political stance is in part due to the legacy that feminist studies and gay & lesbian studies have had on queer studies. Like those areas of study, queer studies is an intentionally activist academic project. It seeks not just to recover the "silent" voices and experiences of queers throughout history, but to disrupt taken-for-granted or naturalized cultural assumptions about gender and sexuality that serve to oppress and marginalize.

LIT 371A
Shakespeare in Performance
Spring 2014
Friday 4/25 6:30-9:15pm, Sunday 4/27 1:00-6:00pm
Friday,Saturday and Sunday 6/6-6/8 8:00am-8:00pm
Perrin Kerns and Meg Roland

More about this course from the instructor:

Shakespeare's plays were performed in the Globe Theater, at a time when, indeed, all the world was considered a stage. In this class, we will see one Shakespeare play here at Portland Center Stage: Othello. Then, we will journey down to Ashland to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival to see three plays, We attend two plays by Shakespeare there, Richard III and The Tempest. We will also see Into the Woods (Music & lyrics by Stephen Sondheim | Book by James Lapine). Two of our plays will be performed in the beautiful outdoor theater, a replica of the Globe Theater in London. NOTE: Students will be responsible for their own food and housing in Ashland. Suggestions for accommodations will be provided in syllabus.

LIT 381A
Literature and Culture of the Romantic Period
Spring 2014
Thursdays 6:30-9:15pm
Bill Rivoire

More about this course from the instructor:

The literature of the Romantic Period (1790-1830) is rich with revolutionary fervor, grandeur of spirit, sensuality of expression, and inherent human goodness. From the prophetic cosmology of Blake and the illusory world of Coleridge, to the tragic, ironic, cynical world of Byron, to the need for the "immediate sensation" of Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats, this period, though short, fully explodes with intensity. With the important contributions of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley, this course offers an opportunity to view major shifts in society, industry and poetic style.
This course will examine selected works of authors whose works have been selected in the context of the history, ideas, and culture of the period. While we will focus on the works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, there will also be discussions of women writers of the period, particularly Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley.
The Romantic Period (after Blake) is noted for its "sincerity": that is, the closer you write about an experience the more real and powerful it is. This is certainly exhibited in the poetry of Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats. Lord Byron, on the other hand, is more ironic, even cynical in his writings, while Coleridge tends to the bizarre. But taken as a whole, this short (1789-1830) literary period is incredibly rich.
The literature of this period can also be described as a return to nature and a denial of the neo-classicists. One of the overarching questions with which we will frame our discussions is WHY this shift and what is its effect on author and reader. We will examine this issue in some detail using individual works of each of the period's major authors.

LIT 468E
Hypertext and E-Literature
Spring 2014
Online
Kathi Berens

More about this course from the instructor:

This course introduces students to

  • various modalities of digital-born texts (sound, touch, hyperlinking, distributed)
  • how e-literature differs from print-born works
  • new & exciting literature made possible by computation
  • why preserving e-literature is so challenging, and what that means for culture.

We'll dive into poems & stories with the aim of learning how they're made, how they make us feel, and why they're changing how, where & why literature is read today.  Both scholars and media makers, we'll author critical and creative works.

Preserving an e-literary work is challenging because they are made in software that becomes obsolete -- no longer "supported" and so inaccessible after its brief pocket of newness wears a hole, and the work slips from of our grasp, trapped forever in machines and operating systems we leave behind.  For the first time, literature doesn't "work."  Books a thousand years old still "open" -- they are delicate, and we keep them in helium-filled glass cases to preserve the paper and ink as long as we can.  But e-literature works authored even just ten years ago won't open on today's computers.   The loss is like the Library of Alexandria, it's not a catastrophic fire that destroys access.  It's the breathtaking pace of technological advance itself.

You'll record ambient sound & create a "sound poem" located to a specific site on a map.  You'll study its origin in experimental sound art by John Cage.  We'll workshop each sound poem and collect them on a map.  We'll think about how distributed, networked environments change our access to and perception of literature.

For your final project, you'll make a story or work of criticism in Twine.  It can be either a work of fiction that reflects upon what you learned in this class, or it can be a work of literary criticism analyzing one of the works we studied.

Together, we'll

  • Experiment with ways of reading electronic literature
  • Discover how computational and print storytelling & reading differ from each other
  • Write creatively and analytically
  • Encourage each other
  • Make a vibrant community of thinkers and artists

LIT 492E or CAR 492E or HS 492E
Preparing for Graduate School
Spring 2014
Online
Kirsten Gauthier-Newberry

More about this course from the instructor:
This seminar is designed for Marylhurst undergraduates who are considering going to graduate school. Participants will reflect on their motivations for considering graduate school; will identify factors that need to be considered when evaluating graduate schools and programs; will research specific graduate programs; and will develop a graduate school action plan for themselves

WR 221A
Introduction to Expository Writing and Critical Thinking
Spring 2014
Wednesdays 3:15-6:00pm
Cara Hubbell

More about this course from the instructor:

Reviews and expands on the basic academic essay; teaches students how to analyze and develop a topic, write grammatically correct and organized essays, read professional writing, and apply these writing techniques to a range of academic essay styles. This course meets the Liberal Arts Core (LAC) Outcome: LLE1.

WR 323A
Academic Writing: The Research Paper
Spring 2014
Tuesdays 12:15-3:00pm with online support
Beth Watzke and Kirk Howard

More about this course from the instructor:

College writers are expected to produce academic research papers on a variety of subjects. This advanced class will help students fulfill the requirements for academic writing. Students will learn how to define and focus their information needs in a subject area, how to access and evaluate information, and how to transform information into the foundation for original academic writing. The course reviews and implements the writing process as it applies to the conventions for various academic disciplines. Thesis, organization, process, and documentation will be emphasized, and issues such as writing across the disciplines and plagiarism will also be addressed. The foundation of the class is the exploration of a compelling topic question and the presentation in writing of resulting discoveries. Note: As proscribed by the ELW Department and by Marylhurst University requirements, the paper for WR 323 must be original for this course and can't be an older paper revised, nor can it be a paper from a concurrent class; the paper must be entirely original material written only for this course.

WR 323EA
Academic Writing: The Research Paper
Spring 2014
Online
Tiffany Timperman and Kim ReadMore about this course from the instructor:

In this advanced course, students will meet online with Tiffany Timperman for the writing part of the course. We will read from The Curious Researcher and A Writer's Reference and use writing to explore and produce focus. Tiffany's lessons will cover the writing process, choosing and developing a topic, strategies for research, thesis, and prospectus, among others. Students will then meet with Kim Read for the research section of the course, where they will cover research methods and systems, locating and evaluating sources, citations, bibliographies, ethics. Students will then take the writing through drafting and workshops to produce a final paper that will meet academic standards.
College writers are expected to produce academic research papers on a variety of subjects. This advanced class will help students fulfill the requirements for professional and academic writing. The course teaches essential skills in finding and managing information. Students will learn how to define and focus their information needs in a subject area, how to access and evaluate information, and how to transform information into the foundation for original academic writing. The course reviews and implements the writing process as it applies to the conventions for various academic disciplines. Thesis, organization, process, and documentation will be emphasized; issues such as writing across the disciplines and plagiarism will also be included.

WR 340A or CPR 360A
Free-Lance Writing for Contemporary Media
Spring 2014
Tuesday 6:30-9:15pm
John Cullicott

More about this course from the instructor:

This course will use writing for today's Internet media, newspapers, and magazines to help students sharpen written-language skills and improve research and information-gathering techniques. Students will learn how writing for a general audience strengthens fundamentals and enhances powers of observation. This exploration of journalism, free-lance writing, and electronic media presentation focuses on clear, concise, accurate writing.
Students will be able to gain confidence in their ability to organize information and present it in simple declarative sentences. They will learn basic news media methods of information gathering and dissemination and expand their knowledge of public affairs. They will gain an understanding of critical media issues, including ethics, news judgment, and professional responsibility. Students will improve the skills needed to write understandable and interesting nonfiction prose. This is not an introductory-level course. Students will be expected to use advanced language and research strengths to write well-informed, logical articles.

WR 364E or COL 361E or HS 320E
Grant Writing
Spring 2014
Online
T Bernal

More about this course from the instructor:

This course is designed to teach you how to research, prepare and submit grant proposals. Students will prepare proposals in their own interest areas and submit them to the instructor and their classmates, and to funders if appropriate. From idea conception to finding funders to writing with style and clarity to sending off proposals--this course will provide an overview of all the essential steps for developing a grant proposal. The course will build, week-by-week, toward creating a single proposal. You may incorporate your weekly assignments into the final project

WR 366A
Writing Seminar I:Creative Non-Fiction
Spring 2014
Thursday 3:15-6:00pm
Perrin Kerns

More about this course from the instructor:

In this course we will explore multiple forms that creative nonfiction can take: memoir, personal essay, lyric, meditative. Each class will begin with generative writing in response to prompts. As the term progresses, we will respond to drafts of longer pieces in a workshop setting, offering insight and critique that will aid in final revision. This course is designed in collaboration with a similar course at Clackamas Community College, taught by Jay Ponteri this year. Students from Clackamas will join us for our day spent with Justin Hocking to discuss his book: The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld: A Memoir. They will also join us for a final public reading of our work at the end of the term.

WR 467A
Writing Seminar II: Poetry
Spring 2014
Tuesdays 3:15-6:00pm
Ger Kileen

More about this course from the instructor:

Poetry is a written art form which engages our intelligence, knowledge, sensibility, creativity and linguistic skills at the highest levels of which we are capable. As poets sitting down to make a poem we ask a lot of ourselves, intellectually and emotionally. In the safe, encouraging and challenging space of our weekly seminar we will explore many ways in which we can learn both the 'nuts and bolts' of composition, as well as cultivating the openness and vulnerability which allows our best poetry to flourish.

WR 471A
Senior Creative Writing Workshop
Spring 2014
Tuesdays (every other), 12:15 to 3 pm
Marion Pierce, Ger Killeen, Emily Frey

More about this course from the instructor:

This course provides students with the opportunity to revise earlier work from Writing Seminars I and II in preparation for graduate school applications and/or publication. By the end of the course, students will have a polished manuscript to send to MFA programs, to send out for submission to literary journals, or to prepare as a chapbook. Students will develop skills in revision by revising their own pages and by discussing one another's revised work in small workshops.

 

Related News

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Daniel Skach-Mills Gives Poetry Reading

Award-winning poet and Marylhurst alum Daniel Skach-Mills will give a reading at the Holy Names Heritage Center on April 20, 2014.

Calendar

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May 01, 2014

Binford Writing Scholarship Application Deadline

Application deadline. The Binford Writing Scholarship is available for new students with a strong interest in writing. Preference given to commun...

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May 05, 2014

Scholarship application deadline for show:tell: A workshop for teen writers and artists

Scholarship applications due for June workshop for high school students (ages 14 to 18). Scholarships are awarded on needs basis. In the workshop,...

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May 08, 2014

Marylhurst Reading Series: Justin Hocking

Memoirist Justin Hocking will read from his debut memoir, The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld (Graywolf Press). His writing has appeared in T...

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